Trigger Warnings

Some of my posts deal with rape and that means that bits of this blog may be triggering.

Friday, 15 February 2013

"It's only 9 months. To save a life"

"It's only nine months! Isn't that worth it, to save a human life?"

So goes the argument made by those idiots who are in favour of forcing girls and women who get pregnant with an unplanned foetus, to continue with the pregancy and give birth to it against their will.

As anyone who has actually been pregnant knows, it's not 9 months, it's 40 weeks, which is actually nearer to 10 months. The reason tradition has it as 9 months, is because in the old days most women didn't know they were pregnant in those first few weeks.

There is a modern myth abroad which declares that "being pregnant is not an illness" and that it is in fact, nearly exactly like not being pregnant. Again, as anyone who knows anything about it knows, that is simply not true. However for many of us, we have NO IDEA, not a single conception, of just how unlike not being pregnant, being pregnant can be, unless we ourselves experience some of the risks and side-effects or know someone who has done so.

I did a little bit of research on this. Oh all right, I didn't, I went on Mumsnet and asked them - this should not be taken as a comprehensive list or a serious meta-analysis. It's just a list of things people on Mumsnet have had happen to them as a direct or indirect result of being pregnant and giving birth. Some of them are relatively trivial, some are vair serious indeed, like Death. Anyway it's my starting point for a list of potential risks that women undergo, when they decide to keep a pregnancy. Or when somebody decides they have to keep it whether they want to or not. When you see it written down, you wonder how much hatred pro-forced-birthers have for women. For the real hardliners, none of this means anything, they hate us anyway and don't believe our lives have any value. But for the thoughtless knee-jerkers who aren't that committed to the forced-birth arguments, this list might be a useful thing to contemplate. Anyone wanting to add anything, I'd be interested to hear from you.

Anaemia
Anal fissures
Anal incontinence
Anaesthetic mistakes leading to permanent disability.
Asthma - 1/3 of women who have it finds that pregancy makes it worse.
Back pain
Bell's palsy
Blindess (tearing retina during delivery because of pressure of pushing)
C-sec wounds getting infected, haematomas associated with C-sec wounds, keloid scarring.
Carpal tunnel syndrome
Cascade renal colic
Change in digestive system
Change of body shape - breasts and hips do not return to form prior to pregnancy. There are implications for psychological harm there alone.
Coccyx problems - some women have difficulty sitting down forever after.
Constant nausea sometimes for the whole 10 months
Cutting of bladder during caesarean
Death
Decreased suppleness (particularly bad for women who do sport).
Dental problems
De Quervain's Syndrome or Mother's Thumb?
Diarrhea and vomiting lasting for 2 or 3 years after the pregnancy.
Eclampsia
Eczema can be made worse
Episiotomy wounds can open up
Eye prescription changes.
Fistula
Gestational Diabetes. About 8% of women are affected by this.
Guilt and self-loathing from giving child up or not bonding if kept.
Gum disease and wobbly teeth
Haemorrhage
Hair colour change
Hands and/ or feet can grow and not go back to their old size.
Hernia
Hip pain
Hormonal effects on pre-existing conditions ie psoriasis, acne, etc
Hyperemesis, with severe dehydration
Increased risk of gallstones and kidney stones
Increased risk of osteoporosis
Increased risk 12 months post partum for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, FTs) - can leave permanent scarring, cause infertility, ectopic pregnancy etc
Iritis (a horrid auto-immune inflammation of the iris, which leads to blindness if not treated quickly and efficiently. A sudden change in hormones can cause an attack).
Less intense orgasms
Lochia can be retained, causing distention of the uterus.
Lowering of the immune system
Mastitis
Memory implications
Mental Health conditions are often exacerbated by pregnancy.
Months of sleeplessness. Sleep deprivation recognised as serious health risk by most medical authorities in the world.
Muscle tears
Multiple Sclerosis has been known to be triggered in pregnancy
Negative impact on finances that will affect mental health, lifestyle, access to jobs.
Nerve damage
Nipple thrush causing nipples to permanently invert. Leading to lack of confidence, lowered libido etc.
OCD can be triggered/get worse post partum.
Pain of the milk coming in.
Permanent increase in blood pressure
Piles
Plantar fasciitis
PND
Post partum hyperthyroidism, leading to the need to take thyroxine for the rest of ones days.
Post-birth complications. Poor stitching followed by repair operation months later.
Post natal psychosis
Pre-eclampsia
Pre-existing conditions like Arthritis, need drugs to control them. These drugs are harmful to foetuses and need to be stopped, leading to the woman with arthritis ending up in constant pain for years, possibly life and needing to use a wheelchair.
Pre-natal anxiety and depression is generally not discussed but common.
Prolapse
PTSD
Restless Leg Syndrome
Scarring
Sexual problems (libido, sensations)
Skin changes like patches, spots etc. Sometimes patches never clear up.
Snoring and sleep apnoea
Spinal migraine
Sore and painful joints, sometimes lasting months or years.
SPD - a syndrome which can lead to serious disability and pain, no cure.
Splitting of chest muscles (can't remember term, but colleague could fit a fist in the space between her muscles)
Tears into urethra and clitoris as well as vaginal and anal.
Thrombosis- deep vein and superficial vein
Tokophobia
Urinary Incontinence - stress incontinence, urge incontinence and both. This would be considered a major effect in a man, but for some reason women are supposed not to mind. This can lead to lack of confidence, depression etc. (Which since this is how patriarchy likes women to feel, should possibly be seen as not a side effect at all, but a lovely womanly enhancement.)
Varicose veins
Women who suffer Gestational Diabetes are more likely than average to develop diabetes later on in life. Sometimes gestational diabetes will be permanent.

Only 9 months eh? I don't think so. Now imagine telling a man that he should risk any of the more serious things on this list (or even some of the less serious things), in order to save the life of a child, because human life.

It just wouldn't happen would it? Because unlike women, men matter.

7 comments:

  1. Thank you for this excellent list. It is just what I've been looking for. I will use it frequently.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Being pregnant can jeopardize a woman's health, both during pregnancy and for the rest of her life. Thanks for this list.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I had a c-section so I had a spinal... the hole did not seal back up so I experienced spinal headaches and needed a blood patch done.... it was a horrible experience!

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  4. hemorrhoids!! may not seem big but i still have flair ups 6 months after my baby was born and they are painful!!

    ReplyDelete
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  6. Stretchmarks! I'm covered in them, from my pubis to above my belly-button, they'on my breasts, thighs and bottom too.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Even if none of that other stuff happens, you suffer a loss in nutrients which must be made up for after the baby is born, good luck with that if you're breastfeeding (and I'm for breastfeeding, but that's the reality), and of course no woman is apprised of this, nor is anything done other than handing her a scrip for prenatal vitamins which may or may not do any good. This situation alone reduces overall health status even if nothing specific seems to be happening. And if not remedied, it affects future children, especially if the mother doesn't wait at least three or four years between babies. Sometime when you have some time to kill, take a look at family photos where there are three or four children present and note how many of them show the younger children wearing orthodontic braces or glasses. There are usually nutritionally-influenced developmental reasons that occurs; it is not hereditary in the usual sense.

    ReplyDelete